Facing The End of Circuit Breaker

May 27, 2020

As the 2nd of June grows nearer, you can begin to hear a collective sigh of relief encompass our little red dot. Finally, the end to Singapore’s 2-month long circuit breaker has come to a close. While this announcement may spell an end to midnight zoom parties and our acceptable aversion to formal wear, it is safe to say most Singaporeans are looking forward to reopening the economy and healing from the effects of the global pandemic. But, whilst this may seem like the end of the Covid-19 chapter, there are still many precautions that must be taken to reduce the risk of a resurgence in community transmission.

Reopening Our Safe Nation in 3 Phases With the daily decline of new local Covid-19 cases and the timely stabilisation of the dormitary situation, the Multi-Ministry Taskforce took to the internet to explain their plans to exit the circuit breaker. On 19th May, the Taskforce revealed that this would be done over 3 phases, aptly named,: “Phase 1: Safe Re-opening”, “Phase 2: Safe Transition” and “Phase 3: Safe Nation”.

According to the Ministry of Health website, Phase 1 will begin on 2nd June when economic activities that do not pose a high risk of transmission are set to resume. During this time, most manufacturing factories would be allowed to resume full production and offices would be able to re-open, but, with tele-commuting and remote working still adopted to its maximum extent. The statement issues by the Singaporean government has also states that those who have been working remotely should continue to do so, with employees commuting to the office only when it is necessary (e.g. to access specialised systems/ equipment that cannot be accessed from home, or to fulfil legal requirements (e.g. to complete contracts or transactions).

Phase 1 will not lift the ban on dining at F&B outlets and most retail shops will continue to stay closed. To find out which businesses can resume operations without applying for an exemption, refer here. Due to the sheer number of businesses involved in this phase, the Ministry of Trade and Industry (MTI) has also decided to grant these businesses a class exemption to resume business.

It is also during this phase that families will be allowed to travel outside their homes in order to meet with other extended family members. Additionally, school is also set to gradually re-open on 2nd June.

Phase 2, named a “A Safe Transition”, seems to be a pupal stage for the country as more activities are slated to be resumed. Assuming the community transmission rates remain low and stable over the subsequent few weeks and the dormitory situation remains under control, more firms and businesses (i.e gyms, retail outlets and tuition centres) will be able to resume.

And, finally, the emergence of Phase 3 “Safe Nation: marks the end of the Covid-19 chapter and the beginning of “a new normal”. By this time, most activities should have resumed and a vaccine and cure for Covid-19 should be developed.

What should Businesses Do After 2nd June As mentioned before, it seems like remote working and tele-commuting will not immediately disappear on 2nd June. However, with business beginning to resume and more companies rallying in anticipation for a chance at the healing global economy, the competition has only become stiffer.

As such, now more than ever, all employees need to be on the same page and proactively readying themselves to sprint forward into any new venture. So, start using VAL’s Free Plan now to predict any possible trends that could show up post-circuit breaker and aid all your employees in looking towards the same direction- success.

Sources:
Gov.SG (2020. 20 May.) Safe Re-opening: How Singapore will resume activities after the circuit breaker
MTI. (2020.) Gradual Resumption of Activities In The Workplace
Ministry of Health (2020. 19 May.) END OF CIRCUIT BREAKER, PHASED APPROACH TO RESUMING ACTIVITIES SAFELY



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About the author

Nicole is a freelance designer and writer that has written articles for different sectors.